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25. Is food combining natural and ethical?

What is food combining?

Food combining as a dietary discipline came out first with the so-called Hay diet in the 1920s, which advocated eating vegetables with either carbohydrates, or meat and fat, and eating fruit in separate meals. This format has been advocated in various forms since then.

File:Food Combining Chart.png

By Qwesar (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

However, the question arises, based on other posts in this blog: is food combing natural and ethical?

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Is food combining natural?

This post is a follow-up on my previous high-protein or high-carb diet post

The reason why these two posts are part of the same argument is because what emerged from that post is the fact that certain animal species have certain body types and lifestyles that govern which foods can be captured, eaten and digested, and these foods tend to be found in certain combinations of food components.

For example, take a lion. It has the build, power, speed, claws and teeth to be able to catch, kill, tear open and eat a large animal. Further, its digestive system is suited to eating a high protein (animal muscle) high-fat diet as it has a short digestive tract ensuring that rotting meat does not stay in the system too long. The nature of the difficulty of capturing animals ensures that lions don’t eat too often, so they don’t get fat despite the high fat intake and relative laziness they appear to display much of the time.

However, what arises from this observation is the list of food components eaten by a lion. It will consume meat, fat, blood, skin, hair, bones, digestive tract contents (fermenting vegetable foods normally) and possibly some soil. They may look for certain herbs or grasses to swallow to aid digestion. They may even eat berries if they are about. They don’t rush off and eat grains or dairy.

Here you can see what it takes to be a true carnivore in close up view (note the size and shape of the teeth and the lack of utensils, romantic music and wine):

On the other end of the scale is the herbivore: horses, cattle, deer, rabbits etc. On the whole they graze much of every day on grasses and any grains that come with them. A little soil may also be consumed. They don’t rush off looking for meat or fish to eat. They don’t make bread out of the grains. Certainly, dairy doesn’t interest them once they have stopped suckling from their mothers.

Their digestive tracts are suited to holding grains long enough to enable them to ferment, as this is the only way grains can be thoroughly digested if they haven’t been sprouted. This is because grains and seeds contain proteins and lectins that are difficult to digest, such as gluten in wheat, which can cause bowel inflammation, ulcers and insulin problems (http://paleoleap.com/11-ways-gluten-and-wheat-can-damage-your-health/)  The reason why grains and seeds have these difficult to digest compounds is to protect the seeds long enough for them to germinate. Upon germination, most of the protective devices disappear, making sprouts a healthy alternative. Herbivores have digestive tracts that help ferment grains.

Here you can see a close view of a cow chewing the cud  (note the flat teeth):

Finally, we come to omnivores which eat some or all of these food groups: plants, fungi, algae, seeds, fruit, insects, eggs and small animals and birds that they can easily catch without tools or weapons. They do not consume milk beyond babyhood. Primates (like us) fall within this category (see https://naturalethicalfood.wordpress.com/2013/12/24/the-human-primates-natural-food/) together with bears, squirrels and birds.

Here you can watch a monkey eating fruit (note the use of the hand to hold the fruit – carnivores and herbivores don’t do this):

There are three natural types of food combining

What this comes down to is that in nature there are three types of food combining:

  1. Carnivorous (mainly meat, fat, skin, bones and fermented digestive tract material)
  2. Herbivorous (mainly grasses and herbs)
  3. Omnivorous (a variety of herbs, fruit, nuts, seeds, algae, fungi, insects, eggs, small animals)

What is notable is that while animals eat combinations of foods suited to their species and makeup, they don’t suffer from obesity or disease. As soon as their diets are changed, their bodies come under stress. This can be seen with some proprietary dog and cat foods that contain mostly grains (often GM). These animals often have to be put on anti-inflammatory drugs from middle-age onward. Another notable is that not one of these groups consumes dairy foods beyond suckling age.

So this tells us that to eat naturally, one should consider which of the three groups one’s body belongs to, and eat accordingly. Also, consider that dairy should not be consumed by any of the groups, past babyhood. Ethically, the omnivorous diet covers humans who choose not to kill, or cause, or be party to pain or suffering of any creature. This could mean taking up a fruitarian diet or a vegan diet.

Which type of food combining is natural and ethical?

The way to decide it to compare a human’s dental make-up with that of other apes. To short-cut this process, the human dental makeup is closest to that of the Bonobo ape. You can see this in this interesting video:

Interestingly, what emerges from this is that the Bonobos with their flat canine teeth do not kill each other or any other creature, while chimpanzees will kill and eat each other and any other creature that they can catch. This means that you, as a conscious human, can choose to eat as a chimpanzee or as a Bonobo. Choosing the Bonobo way ensures that you can eat ethically without any danger of your dying of hunger or malnutrition.

This video carries this message of choice across very clearly:

So, is food combining natural? Yes, definitely, providing the eater is eating foods that fall within the range of foods suited to their species and digestive makeup.

Is food combining ethical? For omnivores, it can be, should they choose foods that do not necessitate killing, pain or suffering.

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Does the blood type diet work?

So many people are discovering that a high animal-protein diet helps them lose weight and feel good, even reducing the effects of illnesses or making them disappear altogether. This works – I know – I tried it before I became a vegan, again.

It helped me lose the weight I had gained (which happened every time I tried to be vegan). It also made the arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and strange shivery and heated spells go away. It also healed my liver and adrenal system.

I was a mess, but eating fish, eggs and vegetables brought me back to life.

So why have I brought this subject up on a blog that advocates eating plant-based food only?

The blood type diet helps me to be a healthy vegan

I tried to be vegan again after healing myself on the high animal-protein diet, as ethical eating is vital to my emotional well-being, but I found I was having trouble keeping my weight down, again. I got fat and felt perpetually tired, making me crave fatty and sweet foods for energy. I was sleeping up to ten or even twelve hours a night and waking exhausted.

A picture of a loaf of bread and wheat stalks

Wheat contains lectins

I finally discovered what my problem was by checking out the blood type diet,  created by Dr Peter D’Adamo: certain foods including legumes and grains disagree with me as they contain lectins that my blood reacts to as if they are poison, causing me to feel exhausted and to consequently eat too many nuts, seeds and grains in an attempt to get more energy.

The blood type diet information educated me as to which grains and legumes weren’t toxic to my particular system, so I could eat more of them and cut down on nuts and seeds, some of which I discovered were also toxic for me.

I lost the water I had started to retain as a result of the lectins in certain foods (wheat, mung beans and lentils are bad for me), and I lost the fat I had gained through eating too many nuts and seeds (cashews and sesame seeds are bad for me). I also started to sleep for eight hours again, and feel energised on waking.

I have noticed on various forums and websites many people saying they ‘don’t believe in’ the blood type diet. It’s not clear whether or not they have tried it, but I would hazard that they either have not, or are already eating foods that agree with them, so have had no opportunity to spot the difference.

Changing to this diet has had such a profound effect on my health that I fully endorse it and will remain on it indefinitely. I realise why I have struggled to maintain my health through the many years I tried to be a vegan (since the age of twelve). I was simply eating the wrong food and kept having to return to an animal-based diet to recover. I wish I had known about this blood type diet then….

How does the blood type diet work?

Peter D’Adamo spent years testing foods against the four different blood types, A, B, AB and O. His theory is that the different blood types originated in different regions and ages, and therefore the foods that were eaten at the time in each region/age by peoples of a particular blood type are what is suitable for those who have that blood type now.

For example, he maintains that O blood type is the original type and originated in Africa. This means that the people were hunters and gatherers, so their diet would have consisted of meat, fish, eggs, fruits, green leaves and roots. This would equate to how people ate in the Palaeolithic era.

Here is a video of what life might have been like for the original O blood type people:

Blood type A people were those who settled and grew crops of grain and vegetables, and kept fruit trees and some domesticated animals. This was the Neolithic age. This video shows what this life might have been like:

B blood type people were nomads, travelling the deserts with their camels, sheep and goats that they used for meat and milk, and foraging for vegetables and fruits. This appears to have been the transitional stage between the paleolithic and neolithic eras, where animals were domesticated, but people didn’t settle anywhere long enough to support an agricultural lifestyle. This video shows how nomads live today:

Blood type AB seems to be a cross between A and B, making these people struggle to find foods that they can digest.

D-Adamo tested foods for these blood types and discovered that each blood type reacts to the lectins or other components of various foods in different ways. These tests proved his theory of the geographic origins of the blood types in that O blood type thrives on meat and vegetables but should avoid grains, A blood types are good with grains but should eat little meat, B blood types are the only ones that manage to digest dairy properly and thrive on the meat of sheep, while AB blood types have inherited the traits of both A and B blood types, which are quite opposite in their responses, making life rather difficult for them.

You can check here which foods are beneficial and which foods to avoid for your blood type.

How does this affect vegans?

The first question I asked when I read about lamb and rabbit being beneficial to me in this diet,and that I should avoid many grains, legumes, seeds and nuts, was: how can I be a vegan and survive?

Then I looked more closely at the list of foods and saw that if I was careful and stuck to only those foods that are beneficial or neutral for me, I would still be able to eat a good variety of foods and remain healthy. You can check this out for yourself.

Peter D-Adamo addresses the question of O blood types being vegetarian, in this video:

Obviously, what he is saying is be careful when you go vegetarian or vegan that you don’t compromise your health, and I agree. Being a healthy vegan takes a structured and knowledgeable approach to food. However, I think people sometimes imagine that O and B blood types eat mainly meat, and this is often the impression given on some websites and blogs advocating the Palaeolithic diet.

This is something I disagree with. Paleolithic man, as we discussed previously, would have struggled to get a lot of meat to eat. He would have eaten mainly vegetable foods, so I don’t believe that it is the meat component that keeps non-vegetarians healthy. I believe that it is just supplementary to the diet and can be replaced with carefully chosen plant-based food. What keeps us healthy is eating foods to which our bodies react positively.

 

Is the blood type diet natural and ethical?

Yes, as I see it, the blood type diet is natural as it encourages us to eat what our ancestors did. It is also better than just following the diet of Palaeolithic and Mesolithic man as it is more specifically tailored to our ancestors’ geographic origins, and therefore our own bodies.

It is also ethical (if we follow the rest of our ethical rules) in that it is good for us – it makes us thrive, feel good and be healthy and disease free.

When I start posting recipes, I will flag them according to blood type .

Have any of you tried the blood type diet? Has it helped? Or made no difference? Please let me know your thoughts.

Next post: High protein or carb?

 

Images

“Bread And Wheat” by Mister GC on http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/

 

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23. Does the blood type diet work?

So many people are discovering that a high animal-protein diet helps them lose weight and feel good, even reducing the effects of illnesses or making them disappear altogether. This works – I know – I tried it before I became a vegan, again.

It helped me lose the weight I had gained (which happened every time I tried to be vegetarian or vegan). It also made the arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and strange shivery and heated spells go away. It also healed my liver and adrenal system.

I was a mess, but eating fish, eggs and vegetables brought me back to life.

So why have I brought this subject up on a blog that advocates eating plant-based food only?

https://rcm-eu.amazon-adsystem.com/e/cm?t=naturalethicalfood-21&o=2&p=48&l=st1&mode=books-uk&search=eat%20right%20blood%20type%20diet&nou=1&fc1=000000&lt1=_blank&lc1=3366FF&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr

The blood type diet helps me to be a healthy vegan

I tried to be vegan again after healing myself on the high animal-protein diet, as ethical eating is vital to my emotional well-being, but I found I was having trouble keeping my weight down, again. I became overweight and felt perpetually tired, making me crave fatty and sweet foods for energy. I was sleeping up to ten or even twelve hours a night and waking exhausted.

I finally discovered what my problem was by checking out the blood type diet  created by Dr Peter D’Adamo;  certain foods including legumes and grains disagree with me as they contain lectins that my blood reacts to as if they are poison, causing me to feel exhausted and to consequently eat too many nuts, seeds and grains in an attempt to get more energy.breakfast-1342299_640

The blood type diet information educated me as to which grains and legumes weren’t toxic to my particular system, so I could eat more of them and cut down on grains, nuts and seeds, some of which I discovered were toxic for me.

I lost the water I had started to retain as a result of the lectins in certain foods (wheat, mung beans and lentils are bad for me), and I lost the fat I had gained through eating too many nuts and seeds (cashews and sesame seeds are bad for me). I also started to sleep for eight hours again, and feel energised on waking.

I have noticed on various forums and websites many people saying they ‘don’t believe in’ the blood type diet. It’s not clear whether or not they have tried it, but I would hazard that they either have not, or are already eating foods that agree with them, so have had no opportunity to spot the difference.

Changing to this diet has had such a profound effect on my health that I fully endorse it and will remain on it indefinitely. I realise now why I have struggled to maintain my health through the many years I tried to be a vegan (since the age of twelve). I was simply eating the wrong food and kept having to return to an animal-based diet to recover. I wish I had known about this blood type diet then….

How does the blood type diet work?

Peter D’Adamo spent years testing foods against the four different blood types, A, B, AB and O. His theory is that the different blood types originated in different regions and eras, and therefore the foods that were eaten at the time in each region/era by peoples of a particular blood type are suitable for those who have that blood type now.

For example, he maintains that O blood type is the original type and originated in Africa. This means that the people were hunters and gatherers, so their diet would have consisted of meat, fish, eggs, fruits, green leaves and roots. This would equate to how people ate in the Palaeolithic era.

Here is a video of what life might have been like for the original O blood type people:

Blood type A people were those who settled and grew crops of grain and vegetables, and kept fruit trees and some domesticated animals. This was the Neolithic age. This video discusses what  life might have been like:

B blood type people were nomads, travelling the deserts with their camels, sheep and goats that they used for meat and milk, and foraging for vegetables and fruits. This appears to have been the transitional stage between the palaeolithic and neolithic eras, where animals were domesticated, but people didn’t settle anywhere long enough to support an agricultural lifestyle. This video shows how nomads live today:

Blood type AB seems to be a cross between A and B, making these people struggle to find foods that they can digest.

D’Adamo tested foods for these blood types and discovered that each blood type reacts to the lectins or various components of foods in different ways. These tests proved his theory of the geographic origins of the blood types in that O blood type thrives on meat and vegetables but should avoid grains, A blood types are good with grains but should eat little meat, B blood types are the only ones that manage to digest dairy properly and thrive on the meat of sheep and wild animals, while AB blood types have inherited the traits of both A and B blood types, which are quite opposite in their responses, making life rather difficult for them.

You can check here which foods are beneficial and which foods to avoid for your blood type.

How does this affect vegans?

The first question I asked when I read about lamb and rabbit being beneficial to me in this diet, and that I should avoid many grains, legumes, seeds and nuts, was: how can I be a vegan and survive?

Then I looked more closely at the list of foods and saw that if I was careful and stuck to only those foods that are beneficial or neutral for me, I would still be able to eat a good variety of foods and remain healthy. You can check this out for yourself

Peter D’Adamo addresses the question of O blood types being vegetarian, in this video:

Obviously, what he is saying is be careful when you go vegetarian or vegan that you don’t compromise your health, and I agree. Being a healthy vegan takes a structured and knowledgeable approach to food. However, I think people sometimes imagine that O and B blood types eat mainly meat, and this is often the impression given on some websites and blogs advocating the Palaeolithic diet.

This is something I disagree with. Palaeolithic man, as we discussed previously, would have struggled to get a lot of meat to eat. He would have eaten mainly vegetable foods, so I don’t believe that it is the meat component that keeps non-vegetarians healthy. I believe that it is just supplementary to the diet and can be replaced with carefully chosen plant-based food. What keeps us healthy is eating foods to which our bodies react positively.

Is the blood type diet natural and ethical?

Yes, as I see it, the blood type diet is natural as it encourages us to eat what our ancestors did. It is also better than just following the diet of Palaeolithic and Mesolithic man as it is more specifically tailored to our ancestors’ geographic origins, and therefore our own bodies.

It is also ethical (if we follow the rest of our ethical rules) in that it is good for us – it makes us thrive, feel good and be healthy and disease free.

When I start posting recipes, I will flag them according to blood type .

Have any of you tried the blood type diet? Has it helped? Or made no difference? Please let me know your thoughts.

Next post: High protein or carb?

 

 

 

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Dairy products – are they natural and ethical food?

Is it natural and ethical to eat dairy products? We’ve been working our way through the list of food types that humans eat to see whether humans are designed to eat them, and whether these foods are ethical choices. For the reasoning behind this quest, have a look at this post.

By dairy products, I mean the milk of, and foods derived from the milk of, cows, goats, sheep, camels etc. Something that amuses me is that human adults will happily drink the milk of an animal yet, if offered the milk of a human, will recoil in horror. Makes no sense to me, honestly. I mean, look where your milk and cheese comes from – there’s the picture, above.

 

Investigation
Is it natural?

Can we (human primates, equipped only with our bodies and natural items such as rocks, sticks, soil, fire, etc) catch an animal and milk it? Chances are slim. The only way would be to capture some calves or other baby animals, rear them, let them breed, and after the females give birth, milk them. Seems like an awful lot of trouble to go to…..

Is it natural? Well, I don’t see the other primates going to these lengths to get food. They certainly don’t go up to a lactating animal and start sucking milk. This is because milk is meant to rear the young of the particular animal it is designed for. So, milk from a cow is for calves.

Humans who drink and eat dairy products should consider that milk is designed to make a calf gain 3/4 kilogram per day. In one year, they will weigh eight times as much as they did at birth. Humans should weigh three times as much as they did at birth, by their first birthday. Thereafter, natural human weight gain slows right down and should stop when they become adults.

So, if a human drinks milk and eats dairy products, they stand to gain weight at the same rate as calves do. Result – obesity.

 

Is it ethical?

a) Has it suffered the least harm?

Taking milk from an animal means that you are depriving the baby animal of its natural food. To get the full quantity of milk from an animal in a dairy farm, the babies are killed at a very young age. Some females may be kept for breeding but, on the whole, the males are killed and sold as veal, or just disposed of. In New Zealand alone, over 1.5m calves are killed annually, in the dairy industry.

So, the adult female is deprived of her young, and the baby is killed. This is not ethical.

b) Has it had the best life possible?

Any animal kept captive for its milk is not having the best life possible.This film explains this all very carefully. Dairy is not ethical.

c) Is this food good for us?

Dairy products are not good for humans. There are many reasons, including the risk of obesity as outlined above.

  • It removes calcium from your bones because it makes the body pH acid
  • It creates a myriad of diseases due to its acidifying effect, including arthritis, diabetes and auto-immune diseases.
  • The antibiotics in commercially-produced milk is bad for humans.

 

Final verdict – my opinion:

Dairy products are neither natural food for humans, nor are they ethical.

Definitely off the list.

What do you think?

Next post: eggs

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12. Dairy products – is this natural and ethical food?

Hello again. Is it natural and ethical to eat dairy products? We’ve been working our way through the list of food types that humans eat to see whether humans are designed to eat them, and whether these foods are ethical choices. For the reasoning behind this quest, have a look at this post

By dairy products, I mean the milk of and foods derived from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, camels etc. Something that amuses me is that human adults will happily drink the milk of an animal, yet, if offered the milk of a human, they recoil in horror. Makes no sense to me, honestly. I mean, look where your milk and cheese comes from – there’s the picture.

 

Investigation

Is it natural?

Can we (human primates, equipped only with our bodies and natural items such as rocks, sticks, soil, fire, etc) catch an animal and milk it? Chances are slim. The only way would be to capture some calves or other baby animals, rear them, let them breed, and after the females give birth, milk them. Seems like an awful lot of trouble to go to…..udder-7481_1280

Is it natural? Well, I don’t see the other primates going to these lengths to get food. They certainly don’t go up to a lactating animal and start sucking milk. This is because milk is meant to rear the young of the particular animal it is designed for. So, milk from a cow is for calves.

Humans who drink and eat dairy products should consider that milk is designed to make a calf gain .45 kilogram per day (1) . In one year, a calf will weigh eight times as much as it did at birth – that is, a 30kg calf will weigh 240kg in about a year. Humans should weigh three times as much as they did at birth, by their first birthday. Thereafter, children should be weaned from milk causing their weight gain to slow right down, and it should stop when they become adults.

So, if a human (especially an adult) drinks milk and eats dairy products, he or she stands to gain weight at the same rate as calves do. Result – obesity.

Is it ethical?

a) Has the animal supplying the milk suffered the least harm?

Taking milk from an animal means that you are depriving the baby animal of its natural food. To get the full quantity of milk from an animal in a dairy farm, the babies are killed at a very young age. Some female calves may be kept for breeding, but, on the whole, the males are killed and sold as veal, or just disposed of. In New Zealand alone, over 1.5m calves are killed annually, in the dairy industry, and 21 million globally (3) for veal and beef.

This video shows how calves are removed from their mothers one day after birth to be raised for veal – be warned – it’s awful:

So, the adult female is deprived of her young, and the baby is killed. This is not ethical.

b) Has the animal supplying the milk had the best life possible?

Any animal kept captive for its milk is not having the best life possible.This film explains this all very carefully. Dairy is not ethical.

c) Is this food good for us?

Dairy products are not good for humans. There are many reasons, including the risk of obesity as outlined above.

  • It removes calcium from your bones because it makes the body pH acid
  • It creates a myriad of diseases due to its acidifying effect, including arthritis, diabetes and auto-immune diseases.
  • The antibiotics in commercially-produced milk is bad for humans.
  • The oestrogen in milk creates hormonal imbalances in humans resulting in premature puberty, breast cancer, and ‘man boobs’ (2)

Here is an investigation on the problems related to dairy intake:

Final verdict in my opinion

Dairy products are neither natural food for humans, nor are they ethical.

Definitely off the list.

What do you think?

Next post: eggs

 

  1. http://www.milkproduction.com/Library/Scientific-articles/Calf-Management/Calves/
  2. http://doctorklaper.com/answers/answers11/
  3. http://freefromharm.org/dairyfacts/